BCCPAC Parent Conference Day 2

The Zoom Webinar was jam packed with information for parents on Saturday May 29. Here is a brief summary of the presenters and some resources.

We received a thorough recorded presentation from Dr. Gordon Neufeld that outlined all of his research and practices on attachment with children. It is possible for children (and adults) to flourish through challenging times. Think of the plant analogy. In order to foster character traits (emergent, adaptive, integrative) that we want to see in our children, the conditions need to be conducive to growth. Where there are deep roots (belonging, love, being known), people feel attached and secure, and then you see fruitfulness. Discussion on important impacts on development (pyramid) including play, rest, feelings, attachment. 

Unfortunately Tyrone McNeil was unable to join us, so Jan Haugen presented on behalf of the First Nations Education Steering Committee. Great overview of the history, recommendations, and guidelines that are being implemented in BC’s education system. Many ways for parents and PACs to support. Check out these resources here: Learning First Peoples Classroom Resources – First Nations Education Steering Committee FNESC If we “make room on our Agenda” at PAC and DPAC meetings, it opens the door for more discussion and involvement from first nations parents.

After lunch, Dr. Greg Gerber from Safer Schools Together gave an eye opening picture of where kids and teens are coping through the pandemic and some serious implications related to social media and online safety. There are tips and tools for parents to be aware of and intervene when warning signs present themselves. Kids generally want attention and support through difficult social and emotional situations. Check out the parent guide below and resources here.

Dr. Ashley Miller explained what it means when parents “flip their lid”, reacting instead of responding to a situation with their children. The “Parent Alarm” goes off and we can either feel guilt or follow a better way of responding. She suggested that parents attend to their own needs first in order to better support their families. She recommended 1) putting a child’s feelings/concerns into works and acknowledging how difficult it is and then 2) finding ways to provide emotional/practical support. Below is a list of helpful resources for parents.

We recommend reviewing BCCPAC’s website here and following them on Facebook to get regular updates and links to resources. Talk to your PAC about being a member and sharing the periodic email updates. They do so much to advocate for parents and support PACs.