DPAC General Meeting Monday, January 11th

Our first meeting of 2016 will be held Monday, January 11th, at Van Bien Training Centre.

2016 January 11 – DPAC General Agenda
DPAC_20151207
December Report to DPAC for Jan 11 Meeting
Suggested resolutions for BCCPAC
Executive Board Report – for January 11 2016 docx


Webconference login:

Apologies – technical difficulties have knocked us offline this evening!

Now back online, as of 740.

https://ca-sas.bbcollab.com/m.jnlp?sid=7345&password=M.419115BF2D5A2197EB752580B6CCDD

First Time Collaborate Users

  • You may be prompted to download some software which may take anywhere from 2 to 20 minutes depending on your Internet connection speed. Join your meeting early if you can.
  • A microphone and headphones or speakers will allow you to participate fully in the meeting.
  • Visit the Configuration Room and use the Audio Setup Wizard before the session to make sure your computer’s audio is configured correctly.

Monday, January 11, 2016, 7:00 p.m., Van Bien Training Centre
1. Call to order
2. Adoption of agenda and Adoption of Minutes
3. PAC Networking and discussion (To increase the effectiveness of this section of the agenda, we suggest that people report on ideas that may be of interest to other PACs, or concerns that other PACs could help with.)
7:30pm – Partner groups enter

4. Partner Group Presentations (five minutes each – questions may be taken about general topics)
a) DSAC Report ( )
b) CUPE Report (Karen Wong)
c) Prince George District Teachers Association Report (Richard Giroday)
d) Prince George Principal and Vice Principals Association Report (Dan Watt)
e) Professional Employees Association ( )
f) Acting Superintendent Report (Sharon Cairns)
g) Trustee Report (Brenda Hooker)
(5 – 10 minute snack break, opportunity for further partner group discussions)

5. Officer and Committee Reports
a) Executive Board Report (Sarah Holland)
b) Treasurer’s Report (Gillian Burnett)
c) BCCPAC Report ( )

6. PAC and Parent Assistance
a) Communicating with PACs and parents
b) Grant requests
c) Future event planning

7. Advising School District
a) Rural Consultation Committee
b) Education Services Committee Report (Steve Shannon, )
c) Education Programs and Planning Committee Report ( Mike Gagel, )
d) Policy and Governance (Sarah Holland, )
e) Suggestions for School Board Report

8. Other Business
a) Resolutions for BCCPAC
b) Radon
c) Food Safe
d)
9. Agenda items for next meeting
10. Adjournment – Next meeting is scheduled for Monday, February 1st at 7:00 pm, Van Bien.

Strategies for Supporting Student Mental Wellness Workshop

Join us on January 19th for an informational workshop on supporting youth mental wellness in the  school setting. The session will be offered at two different times at the Van Bien Training and  Development Centre (311 Wilson Crescent):
 7:00-8:30 p.m. – This session is designed for parents, youth and community members. (To
register, please contact Cindy Morris at Student Support Services for School District 57. She  can be reached at (250) 561-9235 or cmorris@sd57.bc.ca.)

More information: Workshop Flyer

Superintendent Resignation

DPAC was on the email list today for an email sent out by Brian Pepper, Superintendent of Schools, to announce his resignation.

We thank Mr. Pepper for his service to our children over the years, and wish him the best in the future.

2015.12.01

Dear Chairperson:

For reasons connected to health and opportunity, I am submitting this resignation to you today.  My final day of employment will be December 31, 2015.  

I have enjoyed every day in School District No. 57 (Prince George).  

My school experiences as a teacher, vice principal and principal allowed me to work in service to thousands of students and their families.    My teachers, support staff and administrative colleagues worked in unison providing a productive, collegial environment focused on quality curricular and extra-curricular opportunities for students.  District support staff worked tirelessly to maintain facilities and support school staff delivering service to students.  I am honoured to have worked with such “kid centred” teams.

My final decade in the Board Office as an Assistant Superintendent and Superintendent allowed me to learn about a system striving to make learning more relevant for students yet facing complicated fiscal challenges.  Again, I was blessed to work beside dedicated teams unrelenting in their drive to balance pressures and provide support to our schools.  I am proud that financial challenge was never used as an excuse for inaction.  This team of “angels” saw each problem as an opportunity to make our system more responsive to the needs of students, staff and community.  As a result, student achievement improved.

I have thoroughly enjoyed my work with community, parent and media partners.  Their interest in working together in service to youth and the community at large has been enlightening, enriching and motivating.  I know we have only ignited a portion of the potential opportunities available and will watch carefully as growth and partnership opportunities expand in the coming decade.

School District No. 57 (Prince George) has been a wonderful place to work and learn.  Learning is, and must remain, the primary focus of all work and decision making in the school district!  

There is no greater privilege than to be allowed to not only touch the future, but shape it. Thank you for providing me with the opportunity to serve others.

Sincerely,
Brian Pepper, Learner

School board meeting – December 8, 2015

This may be a record for SD57 board meetings – the annual inaugural meeting just took about 7 minutes.

  • Tony Cable – elected as chair.
  • Tim Bennett – elected as vice-chair.
  • Sharel Warrington – elected as BCSTA provincial counsellor.
  • Bruce Wiebe – elected as BCPSEA representative.

No positions were contested.

As a technical note, SD57 makes two methods avaible to view board meetings – a link for Windows, and a link to Mac. The link for Windows doesn’t seem to work on current versions of Windows, but people can use the Mac link to view –  mmsh://199.175.16.202. Copy that text to the clipboard, open up VLC player (possibly downloading it first – it’s a very good media player though), and then Media, Open Location from Clipboard.

 

 

Agenda – General Meeting – December 7, 2015

Web conference link: https://ca-sas.bbcollab.com/m.jnlp?sid=7345&password=M.4D3237AB240411A3E87DD7E9F7C24D

A web conference link will be available, for people who are not able to attend the meeting in person. Please email chair@sd57dpac.ca if any questions.

 

Agenda – DPAC General Meeting
Monday, December 7th, 2015, 7:00 p.m., Van Bien Training Centre
1. Call to order
2. Adoption of agenda and Adoption of Minutes
3. PAC Networking and discussion (To increase the effectiveness of this section of the agenda, we suggest that people report on ideas that may be of interest to other PACs, or concerns that other PACs could help with.)
7:30pm – Partner groups enter

4. Partner Group Presentations (five minutes each – questions may be taken about general topics)
a) DSAC Report ( )
b) CUPE Report (Karen Wong)
c) Prince George District Teachers Association Report (Richard Giroday)
d) Prince George Principal and Vice Principals Association Report (Dan Watt)
e) Professional Employees Association ( )
f) Superintendent Report (Brian Pepper)
g) Trustee Report (Brenda Hooker)
(5 – 10 minute snack break, opportunity for further partner group discussions)

5. Elections –Vacant Director position

6. Officer and Committee Reports
a) Executive Board Report (Sarah Holland)
b) Treasurer’s Report (Gillian Burnett)
c) BCCPAC Report ( )
7. PAC and Parent Assistance
a) Communicating with PACs and parents
b) Grant requests
c) Future event planning

8. Advising School District
a) Rural Consultation Committee
b) Education Services Committee Report (Steve Shannon, )
c) Education Programs and Planning Committee Report ( Mike Gagel, )
d) Policy and Governance (Sarah Holland, )
e) Suggestions for School Board Report

9. Other Business

a) BCCPAC Resolutions
b) Radon
c) Sports Insurance
d)

10. Agenda items for next meeting
11. Adjournment – Next meeting is scheduled for Monday, January 11th at 7:00 pm, Van Bien.

Enrolment and Capacity Numbers and comparisons

This link goes to a Tableau Public page, which has a variety of graphs and tables showing enrolment, capacity, and projections comparisons.

https://public.tableau.com/views/SD57-EnrolmentComparisons/EnrolmentComparisons?:embed=y&:display_count=yes&:showTabs=y

The data is primarily from the Ministry of Education (including the data for 2015-2016, which is slightly different than the data reported at the November 24th school board meeting).

The capacity data comes from the Long Range Facilities plan, released in 2015, with an amendment for Foothills to correct it to 298 students.

Note that operating capacity is an attempt to indicate how many students can be educated in a school, and is based on the following:

  • Kindergarten 19 students per classroom
  • Elementary (Grades 1-3) 21 students per classroom
  • Elementary (Grades 4-7) 25 students per classroom
  • Middle & Secondary 25 students per classroom

A classroom can have a maximum of 22 kindergarten students, 24 grades 1 to 3 students, and 30 students per class in grades 4 and up.

A school with 10 classrooms would therefore range from a maximum capacity of 220 kindergarten students, to 300 grade 4 to 7 students – the true capacity of a school will therefore differ from the operating capacity.

The target as established by the Ministry of Education for districts of our size is 95% of the operating capacity.

Rural Education Consultation Meetings

The school board has created an ad hoc committee on rural education, and has now engaged a consultant to gather information from people regarding the successes and challenges of rural education in this district.

They have not defined rural, but left it to be “inclusive and self-determined”.

The board’s original committee composition did not include parents as a partner group, but when this was pointed out to them at the November 24th board meeting, they added a representative from DPAC to their terms of reference, in addition to the planned second representative from CUPE.

The board also approved a motion at the November 24th board meeting to allocate up to $20,000 to hiring a consultant to facilitate community consultation meetings.

If you have comments to make about the successes and challenges of rural education that you would like passed along to the board, please let us know.

If you are a parent in Mackenzie, then your session was held November 16th, from 5 to 7pm. We hope you knew about this.

Parents in McBride have an opportunity to meet on November 30th, from 4pm to 6pm, at McBride Secondary.

The committee then travels to Valemount Secondary the same evening, to meet from 7:30pm to 9:30pm.

On December 2nd, from 5pm to 7pm, residents of the northern part of the Prince George area are apparently invited to Glenview Elementary. It is unclear how this is being publicized. Presumably, this would include residents of Bear Lake, Nukko Lake, Salmon Valley, and Shady Valley, and the former Springwood area.

On December 3nd, from 5pm to 7pm, residents of the southern and eastern parts of the Prince George area are apparently invited to Pineview Elementary. It is unclear how this is being publicized.  Presumably, this would include Hixon, Giscome, Pineview, and Blackburn, and surrounding area.

On December 10th, from 10 to 12pm, the committee will be meeting with all the principals from the rural areas, and then a report will go to Management and Finance.

If you’re in a “rural area”, and haven’t heard of these consultations, or if you would like to provide input through email or a letter  – please let us know, as we would be quite happy to pass that information on to the board.

Change to district calendar – two more non-instructional days

The school district has added two non-instructional days to the calendar – Tuesday, February 9th, and Monday, April 25th, 2016. 

The Ministry of Education has advised school districts of two additional non-instructional days for the 2015/2016 school year.

The new hours of non-instructional time are to be used for the purpose of enabling teachers to participate in discussions and activities related to implementation of the new BC curriculum.

In School District No.57, the two days designated for this work are Tuesday, February 9, 2016 and Monday, April 25, 2016.

Cyber-bullying report

http://www.rcybc.ca/sites/default/files/documents/pdf/reports_publications/rcy_cyberbullying-web.pdf

“Cyberbullying involves the use of digital technologies and services including social media, texts, and instant messaging to repeatedly harass and intimidate others. The issue of how best to reduce and penalize cyberbullying has not been resolved by any jurisdiction to date.

However, just because the task is difficult doesn’t mean that there is any less onus on governments to do their best to protect and prevent young people from involvement in cyberbullying – as victims, perpetrators, or, as this report shows, sometimes as both.

The high-profile suicides in recent years of Canadian teenagers – including British Columbia’s Amanda Todd – appeared to be a response to particularly vicious cyberbullying. These tragic cases, and many other instances of exploitation of young people, have brought the issue of cyberbullying to the forefront of public consciousness. The provincial government’s approach to cyberbullying has initiated some dialogue on these issues, but difficult and pressing questions remain to be addressed.

This report, a joint effort by B.C.’s Information and Privacy Commissioner and Representative for Children and Youth, provides important context and background on the issue of cyberbullying, with a particular focus on this province. More importantly, it provides recommendations for how the provincial government can comprehensively address cyberbullying – including education and prevention efforts for young people, protection of privacy concerns, and appropriate prosecution of offenders. It also includes a discussion about a role in the dialogue on cyberbullying for social media companies operating from, or reaching into, B.C. This report also highlights the concept of digital citizenship, which broadly refers to the responsible use of communication technologies in the online world. Digital citizenship education addresses cyberbullying and other issues related to it, such as privacy and security, relationships and communication, Internet safety, the digital footprint, legal and ethical aspects of online behaviour, and the role of information and communication technology in society. Prevention efforts must include promoting a greater acceptance and understanding of digital citizenship.

What this report shows is that there is still much to be learned about cyberbullying, its causes and effects, and how it differs from face-to-face bullying. The report also explores the potential for cyberbullying to touch thousands of lives, given that children and youth spend a great deal of their lives online and on social media, in large part through mobile devices that can connect them from virtually anywhere.”

 

Parents at Blackburn elementary have started a healthy food program in response to hungry kids.

Randi Dery started volunteering in her boy’s classroom last year, when she started noticing some students consistently weren’t eating lunch.

“I was seeing that more and more kids were coming to school with no food,” said Dery, mother to seven-year-old Kaleb and six-year-old Brody.

“Hungry kids is angry kids. They disrupt the class and it’s a snowball effect,” said Dery, who was volunteering because her son’s class was “very high maintenance.”

So she spent the summer planning, and by September had the program in place.

It’s called Let’s Eat and twice a week Dery fills a basket of fresh food – fruit, juice boxes, fig bars – in each of the 10 classrooms.

It’s important to Dery that the food be in the rooms and available to everyone, unlike some food programs where kids go to the office to get a meal.

“That’s not fair. They shouldn’t have to put their hand up and say ‘I’m hungry, can I go get food?’ because there’s shame involved,” she said. “They don’t want to say they’re hungry. I just think it’s important not to put a spotlight on those kids.”

She estimated it costs about $60 a month to sustain the program.

– See more at: http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/news/local-news/parents-start-school-food-program-1.2106626#sthash.IPRafmTm.dpuf