Superintendent Speaking Notes – February 3, 2014

District Parent Advisory Committee

SUPERINTENDENT’S SPEAKING NOTES

2014.02.03

 

  1. Secondary Second Semester
    1. Please review your child’s course schedule
    2. Please ensure you are discussing class curriculum and progress
    3. Please contact your child’s teacher with any questions or concerns – be involved early in the semester

 

  1. The “Big Three”:
    1. Superintendent’s Report on Achievement
    2. District Achievement Contract
    3. SD57 Budget Process

–       There is a linkage between each of these 3 documents.

–       You should see each document reflected in the others.

 

  1. Crime Watch Canada – Tips for Parents About the Internet
    1. “Know what your kids are doing online!  Negotiate what sites and social networking are acceptable
    2. Teach you kids all about the internet and its anonymity – people can lie about anything
    3. Tell children to discuss with you situations where they want to give out their personal information so you can make a decision together.  Remind them that anything they write or post is now potentially public domain forever.
    4. Discuss sex and the net and sexual predation.  Tell them that someone who deserves their trust will never ask for sexually explicit photos or talk about sex in uncomfortable detail nor will they tell them to hide things from their parents.
    5. Tell them that they must always talk to you about meeting someone in person that they met online.  Tell them that you or another trusted adult must accompany them to the meeting.”

 

 

 

  1. Social and Emotional Learning

One of the district’s eight (Essential Eight) key areas for staff and student learning. Anchored in research and intended to develop ability for students to:

i.   Understand emotional needs.

ii.  Respect self and others.

iii. Develop cooperative relationships.

 

Social and emotional learning enhances academic achievement, helps students develop self-management and self-control, improves relationships, reduces conflict, improves classroom management, and helps young people’s health and success at school.

 

 

 

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