Social Media – What are Your Kids Doing?

Sites and Apps Kids Are Heading to After Facebook
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Remember MySpace? Not so long ago, practically every teen in the world was on it –- and then many left for Facebook. Now,as Facebook’s popularity among teens is starting to wane, you might be wondering what the new “it” social network is. But the days of a one-stop shop for all social networking needs are over. Instead, teens are dividing their attention between an array of apps and tools that let them write, share, video chat, and even shop for the latest trends.
Knowing the basics — what they are, why they’re popular, and the problems that can crop up when they’re not used responsibly — can make the difference between a positive and negative experience for your kid.

 

 

Most Popular!  

Pheed is best described as a hybrid of Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube — except that you can require others to pay a premium to access your personal channel.

Why it’s popular
Pheeds multimedia “all in one” offering seems to be capturing teens’ attention the most.

 

What parents need to know

 

  • Privacy updates are in the works. Kids should be aware that their posts are currently public by default and therefore searchable online.
articles from Common Sense Media
Parenting, media, and everything in between.Essential Facebook Rules for Teens (and children who use facebook)
Facebook essentials to help your kids play it safe — and smart.

 

Keep private information private. When filling out their profiles, teens can leave fields blank. The only pieces of information needed to create an account are their name, email address, and gender. There’s no need for them to post their phone numbers or addresses.  Review regularly

 

Stick with friends. Have teens limit their privacy settings to Friends. That will restrict who sees their information, including pictures and videos. They also should indicate that only friends can look them up and message them.

 

Get a handle on their info. If teens don’t restrict who can share their information, their personal data could end up in marketers’ hands.

 

Pause before posting. The Internet is teens’ megaphone to the world.Encourage them to consider how what they do today will impact their reputation, their college and job prospects, their friendships, and their communities — today, tomorrow, and 10 years from now. They should ask friends before tagging them in photos that could be embarrassing and hold back from saying things they wouldn’t say to their faces.

 

Hunt beyond friends’ feeds. News feeds from organizations or public figures can be a great source of knowledge. Teens can subscribe to individual feeds or search on general terms (poverty, engineering) by keywords as they research summer internships or learn more about causes they want to support.

 

Groom their timeline. Encourage teens to spruce up their timelines by hiding old posts or photos that might damage their reputation and highlighting choice achievements or opinions. Teens applying for summer internships or jobs can personalize their timeline by adding a favorite quotation or cover photo that speaks to their work experience and academic interests.

 

Community Resources

 

Mental Health Awareness Week  October 6 – 12, 201
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This year’s Beyond the Blues: Depression Anxiety Education and Screening Day community events will be held October 10th, 2013 and throughout the fall.
Prince George
Veterans Plaza City Hall
  • Education + mental health and risky drinking screening
  •   October 10
  • 11am-1pm
  • Maureen Davis (Canadian Mental Health Association)
  • 250-564-8644 local 28

 

French

 

                            ~Linda Campbell      School Counsellor

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